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Death Toll Climbs To 31 In California Wildfire

Death Toll Climbs To 31 In California Wildfire

"These folks have lost everything".

Wildfire evacuees have set up tents and campers next to Sonoma Raceway, an auto racetrack supplying them with food, water, bathrooms and other necessities, the Associated Press reported.

State fire spokesman Daniel Berlant said 22 wildfires were burning Wednesday, up from 17 the day before.

Officials were concerned that the many separate blazes would merge into larger infernos.

Over the past two years, he replaced the siding and installed a new air conditioner, stainless steel appliances, and new flooring.

At least 100 others were injured, with the majority of those treated for smoke inhalation.

On Thursday morning, air quality in the most of the region was as bad as Beijing, China's notoriously polluted capital, according to the Bay Area Air Quality Management District.

Any electrical facilities in Sonoma County are owned by the utility, unless the facilities are on private property, King said.

With winds expected to continue blowing smoke from the fires to populated areas this weekend, many schools decided to close Friday and organizers canceled weekend events, including an Oktoberfest in Walnut Creek and a fitness festival and half marathon in San Francisco.

"I want to see my house, see if anything's left", Rodriguez said, gesturing at officers at one roadblock.

"In some cases we have found instances of wires down, broken poles and impacted infrastructure".

Authorities have confirmed two more deaths, bringing the total to 23. He said, "To see all of this is very strange and a little, makes you a little sick to your stomach".

Michael Kaiser, vice president of Wine America, a national wine trade organization, says it's too early to say how badly the wildfires will impact the wine crop. "We can't even get into most areas". Until now, the efforts have focused on "life safety" rather than extinguishing the blazes, partly because the flames were shifting with winds and targeting communities without warning.

Fires were "burning faster than firefighters can run, in some situations", Emergency Operations Director Mark Ghilarducci said.

The Teanaway River fire, which started Oct. 6, burned 341 acres and is 95 percent contained.