Internacional

AMD shares slide as chip maker admits greater Spectre vulnerability

AMD shares slide as chip maker admits greater Spectre vulnerability

Last week the stock rose nearly 20 percent as investors speculated AMD could wrest market share from Intel, whose chips are exposed to risks from possible Meltdown and Spectre attacks.

However, anyone running the operating system on older silicon, such as 2015-era PCs with Haswell or older, can expect to see more "significant slowdowns", which means they will likely notice a degradation e in system performance.

"After investigating, Microsoft has determined that some AMD chipsets do not conform to the documentation previously provided to Microsoft to develop the Windows operating system mitigations to protect against the chipset vulnerabilities known as Spectre and Meltdown".

Although Windows 10 users are also affected, the effect will be most obvious on Windows 7 and 8 systems - giving everyone another reason to upgrade if they haven't already.

Intel has also said that performance impact on its server processors will be released in the next few days.

Smith claimed that the bugs are "unrelated to security", adding that the company advised consumers to use firmware update from their vendors.

On the other hand, Microsoft has discontinued security updates for Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities on AMD systems.

Intel added that based on its tests on SYSmark 2014 SE - a benchmark of PC performance - 8th Generation Core platforms with solid-state storage will see a performance impact of six per cent or less.

It may be pointed out that Meltdown and Spectre are two of the most critical vulnerabilities affecting computer chips ever discovered. The exploits potentially allows hackers to access passwords, encrypted data and other information stored on these devices.

Intel is taking the Meltdown and Spectre flaw quite seriously and is working to release further updates in the coming weeks and months.

"I just ran an update on my Ubuntu Mate 16.04 system, which updated the kernel to 4.4.0-108".

Rosenblatt Securities analyst Hans Mosesmann said Nvidia's driver updates could become a problem for data centres and lead corporate customers to hold off on buying servers which have GPUs. What's more, the hit to "responsiveness", a more specific benchmark that Intel tested its chips for with the new updates, took a much bigger hit.