Tecnología

Zuckerberg says Facebook in 'arms race' with Russia

Zuckerberg says Facebook in 'arms race' with Russia

"The internet is growing in importance around the world in people's lives and I think that it is inevitable that there will need to be some regulation", Zuckerberg said during testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

"We already have a tool to do this in your privacy settings, and now we will put this tool at the top of your News Feed to make sure everyone sees it", said Mark Zuckerberg on his Facebook page. As a physician-bioethicist, I am unable to find platforms or guidelines that can help me navigate this space. "How is today's apology different?"

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg says users whose personal information was obtained by data-mining firm tied to President Donald Trump's 2016 campaign are being informed, starting this week. He'll face House questioners Wednesday.

The stakes are high for both Zuckerberg and his company.

Earlier, Zuckerberg said that his own personal data was among that of 87 million users on his social network website that was allegedly sold by Cambridge Analytica. So one member of the joint committee, average age 62, got to the point.

Zuckerberg deflected requests to support specific legislation.

The 33-year-old billionaire appeared humble throughout much of the hearing, with only a few smug smiles.

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) mentioned the two ladies in a larger discussion about Facebook's targeting of conservatives in recent years.

Zuckerberg disclosed that his company is "working with" special counsel Robert Mueller in the federal probe of Russian election interference. He offered no details, citing a concern about confidentiality rules of the investigation. "I know of no surveillance organisation that gives people the option to delete the data that they have, or even know what they're collecting", said Zuckerberg.

"You're in front of the Congress, you goofy c-sucker!"

Junaid Nabi, M.D., is a nonprofit executive and medical journalist, a fellow in bioethics at Harvard Medical School, and a New Voices Fellow at the Aspen Institute.

Cambridge Analytica whistleblower Christopher Wylie previously estimated that more than 50 million people were compromised by a personality quiz that collected data from users and their friends.

How Facebook makes money from your data, in Mark Zuckerberg's words. He assured senators the company would handle the situation differently today.

"What we found now is that there's a whole programme associated with Cambridge University where. there were a number of other researchers building similar apps", Mr Zuckerberg said.

He also revealed that his firm was exploring whether to take action against the University of Cambridge.

But in general, there didn't appear to be any correlation between campaign contributions and the questions posed.

"This is proof to me that self-regulation simply does not work", the Democrat from Illinois said. An app can ask for access to anything in your profile - and can declare some of that information "required" - and you have to decide if you trust it with that data and if you trust the developer to delete your information should you later remove the app.