Internacional

Missiles coming to Syria - Trump

Missiles coming to Syria - Trump

It sounds cold-hearted to speak like this, but it pays traders to take the correct view on whether there will be a serious American attack or not, what reaction it is likely to provoke, and what it will mean for the markets if it happens or doesn't happen.

U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan said Thursday the U.S. has an obligation to lead an international response to the attack, and that Trump has the authority to use military force.

Trump's comments follow remarks from Russia's ambassador to Lebanon, who reportedly said told a Hezbollah television station Tuesday that Russia would shoot down American missiles fired at Syrian government targets.

The statement by the Foreign Ministry in Damascus comes as a war of words is raging between Washington and Moscow over last weekend's suspected chemical attack on a rebel-held town near the Syrian capital.

The crisis was discussed Monday at an urgent UN Security Council meeting, while the US also circulated a draft resolution for a new independent inquiry of chemical weapons attacks in Syria.

Trump's spokeswoman dismissed this idea, and pointedly refused to say that concern about the risks of a direct confrontation with Russia would hold the US military back. There are several reasons but whilst the world is reeling and debating the chemical attack, they can quietly position themselves in Syria to contain Iran. "But the fate of the region lies in the hands of its own people". More than 40 people died in the assault on the rebel-held Damascus suburb of Douma on Saturday. More than 350,000 people have been killed in Syria's conflict since it started in 2011 with the brutal repression of anti-government protests.

The United States, Britain and France have argued the incident bears all the hallmarks of a strike ordered by the regime, which has been blamed for previous attacks by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW).

Russia was quick to come to their allies' side after the latest chemical attack.

With punitive US military action seemingly imminent, Russia scrambled to deflect blame from its ally Bashar al-Assad and, according to a monitor group, Syrian forces evacuated key defense buildings in Damascus.

Moscow and Washington have so far vetoed each other's motions to set up an international investigation into chemical weapons use.

Brexit Secretary David Davis, who voted against military action in 2013, said "we've got to make this judgment on a very careful, very deliberate, very well thought-through basis, knowing exactly ... how strong the evidence is".

"We should all be outraged at these horrific reports and images from Douma", said Peter Salama, the UN agency's chief of emergency response.

Trump's tweet also addressed US action against ISIS, who were until recently one of the biggest threats in Syria.

"It's just horrible what happened in Syria", the congressman said". The Syrian government and Russia have denied a chemical attack occurred.